WADA to co-host Asia and Oceania regional anti-doping meeting in Sri Lanka

WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said the meeting is an important one for the region and the global anti-doping movement. Picture: Getty Images

COLOMBO, 18 JUNE 2018 (INSIDE THE GAMES)—Representatives of 29 countries, as well as senior figures from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), are scheduled to attend this year’s Asia and Oceania Region Intergovernmental Ministerial Meeting on Anti-Doping in Sport, which is due to take place in Colombo in Sri Lanka over the next two days.

The meeting, which is the 15th such annual gathering, will be chaired by Faiszer Musthapha, Sri Lanka’s Minister for Provincial Councils, Local Government and Sports.

It will gather together a number of representatives from Governments and National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs) from across the two regions to discuss important anti-doping issues that will help in the fight for clean sport.

“This is an important meeting for the region and the global anti-doping movement,” WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said.

“Asia and Oceania is a part of the world that is growing in importance from a sporting point of view.

“Asia alone comprises around 60 per cent of the world’s population and 80 per cent of the world’s youth, a fact that has not escaped the leaders of many of the world’s biggest sports.

“The involvement of Asia and Oceania in the fight against doping in sport is hugely significant and is clearly reflected in WADA’s governance, with key members of our various committees hailing from this region.

“Above all, this meeting will be a show of solidarity from all countries who attend.

“It is pleasing to see such impressive commitment by the Governments of the region to continue to invest their time and efforts in fighting doping in sport, and therefore protecting the rights of the clean athletes of the world.”

WADA will be joined at the meeting by the Olympic Council of Asia, representing the sport movement, as well as representatives from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation and 29 Governments.

In a packed agenda, the delegates will discuss how to make the most of Government engagement, how the monitoring of compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code supports capacity building and a range of other topics.

“The Government of Sri Lanka and the Sri Lanka Anti-Doping Agency are delighted to be hosting this important meeting in Colombo,” Musthapha said.

“We know very well the importance of maintaining a level-playing field for athletes around the world and meetings such as this provide vital information-sharing opportunities for Governments and NADOs throughout the Asia and Oceania region.

“We remain committed to promoting the highest standards of anti-doping, both here in Sri Lanka and further afield.

“We look forward to a productive meeting and we are delighted that the WADA President Sir Craig Reedie will be in attendance along with other senior WADA figures.

“As always, they can be assured of a warm welcome as we continue to work closely together with the sport movement for the good of clean athletes and to fight against doping in sport.”

The next edition of the Summer Olympics is set to be held in Asia with Tokyo hosting the 2020 Games.

Tokyo 2020 recently received a boost with Japan enacting a law that will see the promotion of anti-doping activity across all sports.

This legislation, enacted at a plenary session of the House of Councilors of Japan, establishes a legal framework for anti-doping measures – something which Tokyo 2020 President Yoshirō Mori says has been “called for globally, and will boost anti-doping activities in Japan”.

It will also make it possible for the Japan Anti-Doping Agency, the Japan Sport Council and public authorities to share information and implement anti-doping measures more effectively.

The passing of the law came less than a month after two-time backstroke swimming world champion Junya Koga was removed from the Japanese squad for the Asian Games after failing a drugs test.

The failure marked another blemish on Japan’s previously good anti-doping record in the build-up to Tokyo 2020.

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