Smith: Prostate cancer affects men over 50

Suva Golden Oldies president Mason Smith speaking at a Social Democratic Liberal Party Movember fundraiser on Tuesday. Picture: SUPPLIED

Prostate cancer affects men over 50 years and the risks increase as one gets older, says Suva Golden Oldies Rugby Club president Mason Smith.

Speaking at a Social Democratic Liberal Party Movember fundraiser on Tuesday, Mr Smith assured Fijians they were ready to pay for medical examination costs for men.

He said the most common age for men to be diagnosed with prostate cancer was between 65 and 69 years.

“If you’re under 50, your risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer is very low, but it is possible,” he said.

“If you’re over 50 and you’re worried about your risk of prostate cancer, you might want to ask your GP about tests for prostate cancer.”

Meanwhile, a web page on the disease, Prostate Cancer UK said family history was important as it was record of the diseases and health conditions in your family.

It said families had many common factors, such as their genes, environment and lifestyle, together, these factors could help suggest if one was more likely to get some health conditions.

“Inside every cell in our body is a set of instructions called genes, these are passed down (inherited) from our parents,” it said.

“Genes control how the body grows, works and what it looks like, if something goes wrong with one or more genes (known as a gene fault or mutation), it can sometimes cause cancer.

“You are two and a half times more likely to get prostate cancer if your father or brother has had it, compared to a man who has no relatives with prostate cancer.

“Your chance of getting prostate cancer may be even greater if your father or brother was under 60 when he was diagnosed, or if you have more than one close relative (father or brother) with prostate cancer.

“Your risk of getting prostate cancer may also be higher if your mother or sister has had breast cancer.”

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