Letters to the Editor – May 3

Oil spill at Walu Bay in Suva. Picture: Alexander Campbell

Citizen journalist

WELL done to the “citizen journalist” who captured the photo of the shameful dumping of oil in the Suva Harbour by a fishing vessel.

And congratulations to Fiji Ports Corporation Ltd for doing the right thing and fining those responsible.

It’s as it should be. As an outrigger canoe paddler in the Suva Harbour for many years, I know that ships have been dumping oil and diesel fuel into the harbour for years.

Some mornings we have paddled through the muck that ships have dumped under the cover of darkness or even in broad daylight.

If all of us take on the responsibility of being citizen journalists and highlight these infractions, maybe we can actually help keep the Suva Harbour clean.

DALE HERMANSON,
Suva.

Armchair critics
AFTER Ben Ryan’s exit and Oscar relinquishing his captaincy, the focus was how will Gareth Baber blend with new captain Jerry Tuwai.

Armchair critics including me began to lose complete hope after a disastrous start to the 2017/2018 series where at one point we ended up fifth in the series.

Gareth and the boys continued with the mission and the turning point was the Hamilton 7s. The injection of speed merchant Naduva, the resurgent “Sledgehammer” Eroni Sau was a plus but the real bounce was the captain and little general from Newtown Jerry Tuwai.

He started to take the captain’s role seriously and the maturity and decision making skills and the confidence in his game resurfaced.

Since then the team has shot the block and are now leading the series with four
great victories. Sa dina, reminds me of the 1992 Tina Turner song Simply the Best
… joka kece.

I was proven wrong and we must remain patient at all times

SHALWYN PRASAD,
Mukta Ben Place, Nabua.

Sevens World Cup
BABER’S team is very good, but the good thing is that they haven’t peaked yet.

I know the coach knows his job better than anyone on the planet right now.

However, I would suggest that he take to Paris and London the team that he will take to San Francisco.

Josua Tuisova, his brother, Radradra, Nakarawa, Kunatani (etc) could be asked now to confirm their interest and commitment, that is if they are available.

If not, then Baber’s team right now is the best available under the circumstances and we will go full lungs when they hit Paris, London and San Francisco.

With Naduva, Nacuqu, Tuwai, Nasilasila, Sau, Tamani in the team, there’s little else one could ask for.

Now, with the inclusion of the “Supermen” mentioned earlier in the squad, the bar will be raised for final selection to fill in the other slots. I don’t know.

DONALD SINGH,
Lautoka.

Climate Change
I AGREE with Dipshikha Singh on her letter, The Fiji Times 02/05, regarding the issue of climate change that it seemed to be the hottest topic in Fiji at present and we as citizens of this country must realise that we must first be responsible at home.

She further highlighted that the PM is setting the standard for us Fijians and she, moreover, suggested that, “It’s time for us small nations to unite and show these superpowers that we also have a voice. Shout and make us heard.”

The same sentiment was echoed by Mr Inia Seruiratu, the Minister for Agriculture and Maritime Development in The Fiji Times 30/04, when speaking on the issue in Bonn when he was lamenting superpowers that “Islands need to be heard”.

While on one hand I fully support what they are saying that superpowers need to listen to small island nations, however, on the other hand I must say that leaders of small island nations, especially here in Fiji, should also first listen to the voice of its people.

For instance, the people around the bauxite mining area in Bua are complaining about the spills from the mining area which is affecting their rivers and qoliqoli, are we listening?

It does not make sense when we are telling superpowers to be responsible when we ourselves are not responsible, it does not make sense telling superpowers to listen when we are not listening.

KOSITATINO TIKOMAIBOLATAGANE,
Vuninokonoko Rd, Navua.

Enforcement of laws
WHILE we have many laws drafted to protect our environment, it is the enforcement of these laws and regulations that is lacking!

We can go on talking about the destruction of our environment until the cows come home, but only until enforcement officers carry out their duties in a forceful and consistent manner will we see some positive changes in our attitudes.

At present the majority just don’t care and its fairly obvious by the poor state of our environment.

The recent fining of a foreign fishing vessel is nothing more than a single breach of thousands around the nation.

The enforcers of our environmental laws must become more responsible and lead the fight to protecting our natural world.

SIMON HAZELMAN,
Savusavu.

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