It’s our responsibility

Volunteers from WWF with a turtle made from bottles at Lami yesterday to mark Earth Hour. Picture: RAMA

Volunteers from WWF with a turtle made from bottles at Lami yesterday to mark Earth Hour. Picture: RAMA

EVERYONE should take the responsibility of disposing their rubbish and waste properly in order to protect the environment.

This was one of the messages relayed by World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Pacific conservation director Francis Areki at the 2018 Earth Hour Connect 2 Earth clean-up campaign at the Lami seashore yesterday.

As part of the event, volunteers collected rubbish along the shore and also planted mangroves.

Mr Areki said more than 100 registered people took part in the event .

“The great thing about this, if people are willing to come out early in the morning, this shows these people are dedicated and passionate about the environment,” Mr Areki said.

“People can actually influence their circle of friends to raise the platforms for mangroves and not to use much plastic and proper disposal of rubbish.

“While walking on the beach, we can see used items such as straws and diapers and so on. People don’t realise wherever they throw rubbish, it has to end up somewhere.”

He said because there was limited space for landfills in Fiji, people resorted to dumping their rubbish in the ocean because it was closer to them.

“They don’t realise how the tides work, it comes back. If you don’t keep you environment clean, basically the environment will rubbish your coastlines,” he said.

He said there was also a need to look at how we could better manage waste and policies in urban settlements .

“It looks like as we suspected it, the bulk of it is actually plastics. The town councils do their job by collecting rubbish but collecting rubbish is just not their job.”

* Editorial Page 6

More Stories