Facebook uses ‘fact-checkers’

Facebook uses fact-checkers to determine if posts are defamatory or false once a compliant is lodged, says Roy Tan, the head of politics and government outreach of Meta, Picture: SOPHIE RALULU

Facebook uses fact-checkers to determine if posts are defamatory or false once a complaint is lodged, said Roy Tan, the head of politics and government outreach of Meta, the parent company of Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp during the recent “Ready to Run” Campaign Training for Women Election Candidates held in Suva.

University of the South Pacific’s Head of Journalism School Dr Shailendra Singh told Mr Tan that he was defamed on Facebook recently and despite a complaint, the post wasn’t removed.

“We have a set of community standards that help to kind of police what can and cannot be replaced or posted on our platform, right,” he said.

“It covers anything from serious threats like terrorism, child pornography to things like bullying and harassment you know incitement to violence and in elections in particular things like voter interference, misinformation on where to vote.

“When it comes to defamation you know oftentimes it’s not a clear cut especially when it comes to politics. “It’s one person saying something this and another person saying that and you know it’s hard for us to kind of judge and determine what is right and what is wrong.

“That’s why we use third-party fact-checkers to help to kind of review some of these.

“‘Having said that, we also have a defamation form that you can find online to report if you find that you’re being defamed.

“Basically you can report based on the criteria or the information that we need from you and what happens is that you know our legal teams will look into it and we’ll review it and if there is defamation or if it is against the policies we’ll take it down.”

The Suva workshop was organised by Dialogue Fiji.

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