Conscientious consumers demand traceable commodities

Kenneth Katafono is the CEO of TraSeable Solutions, a local company which provides blockchain technology based computer solutions. Picture: Lice Movono

Kenneth Katafono is the CEO of TraSeable Solutions, a local company which provides blockchain technology based computer solutions. Picture: Lice Movono

Update: 5:45PM PEOPLE want to know where commodities they purchase is coming from as more consumers become conscientious and this has created the need for computer solutions which can trace the supply chain.

Local tech start
up TraSeable Solutions Ltd, the first firm in Fiji to recognise this niche
market is also the only local organisation actively working to create these
solutions based on Block Chain Technology (BCT), currently a global buzz
concept.

TraSeable
Solutions is this week hosting the first Pacific meeting which will discuss
which other markets could make use of or even be established with a BCT based
solution.

With the
funding and support of the US Embassy and the University of the South Pacific,
the Regional BCT Tech Camp used leading American BCT firm ConsenSys which has a
reputation for providing training.

ConsenSys
which coincidently worked with WWF NZ and TraSeable Solutions on a BCT based
project to track Tuna fishery from when it is caught to the customer, sent
Tyler Mulvihill and Kishore Atreya to Fiji to lead the TechCamp.

Mr Atreya
said two days of deliberations on BCT use in renewable energy, humanitarian
work and conservation pointed to huge potential for Fijian and Pacific markets.

�There�s
exponential potential. Substantial potential because I think island nations are
a good starting point for technology like this because they can incubate, they
can advance their processes, they can advance many of their problems in
specific industries and production processes  that they can specifically
start to get on the block chain and that can advance value exponentially,� Mr
Atreya said.

�I think
there can be a lot of value for Fiji to get on the block chain.�

A specific
part of today�s workshop called on participants who came from Fiji, Tonga,
Samoa, Nauru, Kiribati, Vanuatu, New Zealand and Australia to explore other
sectors where BCT could be applied and help grow markets or systems.

Participants
identified business ideas and government processes in agriculture, fisheries,
land titles registration, organic certifications, ethical trade certification,
education, tourist accomdoation and finance as potential markets.

Kenneth
Katafono of TraSeable Solutions said there were many common themes raised and
called on participants to recognise that the challenge was for the TechCamp to
recognise concepts which had proven feasible by BCT projects elsewhere and see
how it can be implement in the Pacific.

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