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Biomass production

Ana Madigibuli
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

THE recent increase in demand for energy has generated interest to explore and optimise the renewable sources of energy such as biomass in the country.

"Biomass is one of the important sources of energy used in Fiji particularly for domestic energy," USP teaching assistant Vineet Chandra said at the International Conference on Renewable Energy and Climate Change in Suva yesterday.

Mr Chandra said a study conducted showed that the total production of biomass was estimated to be 83.13 petajoules (PJ) of which 71 per cent was from agricultural crop production, 20 per cent from forestry, and 9 per cent from livestock.

He said of the 75PJ produced in the country from agricultural and forestry operations, 0.78PJ of biomass was harvested and burnt as fuel-wood, 20.14PJ was harvested for food, 8.263PJ was used to generate energy in cogeneration and 36.9PJ was unutilised crop and forestry residues.

"The study conducted showed that sugar cane contributes to the highest energy potential from all other feedstock," he said.





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