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Fiji Time: 3:22 AM on Saturday 26 July

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The future on cars

Www.Autotrader.Co.Uk
Saturday, February 23, 2013

People expect the costs of motoring to soar by 2023, learning to drive is becoming more and more difficult for young people and self-driving cars here by 2023.

Auto Trader has conducted a survey about the future of motoring and, along with futurologist, Ian Pearson, we have come up with some intriguing clues as to what we will see over the next ten years of motoring.

Firstly, it would appear that young people are becoming more and more worried about learning to drive and, of course, the associated costs.

According to our survey, 53 per cent of 17 to 24—year—olds believe that the current economic climate and the financial pressures which come with it will discourage more and more young people from learning to drive, while only 33 per cent of those aged over 65 believe this.

The survey also revealed that motorists are extremely worried about the perceived soaring costs of motoring—such as fuel prices, insurance and tax—and think that these costs will double by 2023.

Research suggests that the current average cost of owning a car will double over the next 10 years—rising from £2,290 ($FJ6,199.53) on average today to £4,580 ($FJ12,399.43) by 2023.

This will account for a total of £135bn a year. In response to this, 72 per cent of those asked said that they would alter how and where they drove in order to try and cut costs.

We also asked our respondents about what they think the next big things in car technology will be over the coming decade. Almost two-thirds (62 per cent) said that they thought that windows which act as touchscreens will be making an appearance on our cars by 2023.

The same percentage of people believe that, in ten years' time, cars will be able to communicate with each other, while 42 per cent think that we will have self-driving cars by then.

Futurologist, Ian Pearson, commented on the likelihood of flying cars being prevalent as well, stating that "They are only likely to become as common as helicopters are today. They will be incredibly expensive!"

Men and women tended to agree on the technology that they would be willing to pay more for in the future, although the order was different.

With men's top priority being paying for electrically-powered cars, whereas women would most gladly splash out for an air bag to help protect the car's exterior. Both males and females, however, would be least likely to fork out on buying a fully-autonomous car.

While only 17 per cent of those surveyed said that they would be willing to pay extra for a self-driving car, the industry expects that they will become a relatively common sight on our roads over the next 10 years, with benefits including creating more space by driving closer together and freeing up parking spaces by dropping you off and coming back to pick you up when you're ready.

So, there you have it, the future of motoring by 2023, according to you, the public.


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