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Funnyman Noa Turaganivalu

Luke Rawalai
Friday, December 21, 2012

NOA Turaganivalu is a comedian in his own right and laughter is sure to follow him wherever he goes.

The 42-year-old hails from the village of Sawene in the province of Navosa. He is the youngest of five siblings.

Mr Turaganivalu has a passion for rugby commentary and has a peculiar talent for mimicking legendary rugby commentator Graham Eden, which always has his crowd in fits of laughter.

The funnyman spent his young days mostly glued to his father's radio during rugby matches, listening to rugby commentator Graham Eden belt out his famous running commentaries on the events that unfold in rugby matches.

Mr Turaganivalu labelled Mr Eden as one of his all-time favourite commentators for any given sports.

"The overseas commentators do not even come close to him and he is my favourite commentator," said Mr Turaganivalu.

"Listening to him belt out his views on a game of rugby and the events that unfold on the field by the minute, give listeners a realistic feel to the atmosphere which makes one feel like he or she was at the ground watching the whole match," he shared.

"I first listened to him in 1975 as he was commentating on a sevens rugby match and most of the time I was laughing to myself as I listened to the way he described every move of the players and each phase of the game," he added.

Our The Fiji Times team caught up with the funnyman on board the inter-island vessel Iloilovatu during a recent government tour to the northern division.

Mr Turaganivalu was in comedy mode, entertaining the crew and the government entourage with lively commentary jokes which saw the group in sudden outbursts of laughter every now and again.

Mr Turaganivalu was the official entertainer during the trip and he did not fail in his very interesting duty, much to everyone's delight.

"I grew up in a family of three boys and two girls. I was the little sunshine drawing laughs out of family members as far as I can recall," he said.

"I feel good when people have a good laugh, and I feel important and special when I am able to draw happiness out of people, especially those who are usually engrossed in their day to day jobs and busy lifestyles and have no time for a good, hearty laugh," he said.

"Like the old age proverb, laughter is a good medicine , it has been medically proven that laughing is a true healer which releases hormones that counter stress," he said.

Mr Turaganivalu said he normally ended up in places where people did not know him, yet once have listened to his funny jokes, were more than happy to take him along to any trips or get togethers where he could entertain others.

"People may say what they like to say but I as a person really enjoy what I do and will do anything to get people laughing," said Mr Turaganivalu.

"I was brought into the ship for this trip by a boat crew and they have never regretted their decision to take me along. I am happy to have captivated many on this trip, including top government officials with my funny jokes and imitations. That makes me happy," he said.