Rubbish from informal settlements not disposed properly: Areki

WWF staff and volunteers pick up rubbish on the Lami foreshore. Picture: LICE MOVONO

WWF staff and volunteers pick up rubbish on the Lami foreshore. Picture: LICE MOVONO

Update: 4:47PM RUBBISH from informal settlements is not being disposed of properly and is ending up in our oceans.

WWF, which conducted a clean-up at the weekend as part of its annual Earth Hour campaign, said rubbish found on the beach in Lami pointed to the need for better policy.

From the amount and type of rubbish collected, WWF’s conservation director Frances Areki said it was clear there was a need for conversation between city and urban planners to manage waste disposal better.

“Judging by when we were walking on the beach, you can see the sort of items, straws, diapers – these sort of things people don’t realise whereever you throw your rubbish, it has to end up somewhere,” Mr Areki said.

“In Fiji, where you have limited land for landfills, the ocean is the closest place to throw this rubbish.

“They don’t realise that how the tides work, the rubbish will come back.

“If you don’t keep your environment clean, your environment is going to rubbish your homes and coastlines.”

In addition, the volunteers, including staff from the Fiji Navy planted up to 1000 new mangrove plants in the marsh area near Tikaram Park.

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