Military contribution

THE military is indeed an agent of change (nation building) but I believe not to directly be involved in civilian affairs of this country but only upon request (watchdogs).

THE military is indeed an agent of change (nation building) but I believe not to directly be involved in civilian affairs of this country but only upon request (watchdogs).

While I partially agree with Commander Viliame Naupoto that countering ethno-nationalism has contributed to coups, whether it has been a progressive agent for change ? I don’t know.

I disagree with his views that the military be directly involved with the civilian affairs of this country.

Firstly, I believe they lack the basis of legitimacy that an elected government has through the ballot box; and secondly the suggestion puts a question to the strength of the elected government’s right to rule freely without interference.

However, I must mention that the military must have a say in the affairs of foreign policy and defence of this country. They should also have a say in the size of their budget, size of the army, and technical development of modern combat.

Dissatisfaction with pay and career progression must follow established rules within the army. Generally they must respect elected government(s) directives and their right to rule freely.

The question raised by Opposition parliamentarian Tupou Draunidalo questioning the moral responsibility of the army of the outcome in the past 30 years is interesting.

AMENATAVE YACONISAU

Delainavesi

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