Mangroves to curb climate change effects

THE University of the South Pacific and six villages in Nakorotubu, Ra, planted more than 1800 mangrove plants along the province’s coastline under the restoration of ecosystem services and adaptation to climate change (RESCCUE) project.

The project implemented by USP’s institute of applied sciences (IAS) was piloted in the Ra district after the devastation left behind by Severe Tropical Cyclone Winston which destroyed most of Nakorotubu’s marine ecosystem.

According to USP, members of IAS were in Navuniivi, Nabukadra, Nasau, Nayavuira, Naocobau, and Namarai where they planted more than 1800 mangrove seedlings.

Activities also included coastal tree planting as well as mapping existing on-ground work as part of the coastal community-based protected areas, mangrove protection and fisheries management initiatives in Ra.

In addition, a total of 1362 seedlings consisting of nine species of coastal trees were delivered to 10 other villages in Ra.

According to the institute, the aim of the RESCCUE project was to contribute to increasing the resilience of Pacific Island countries and territories by supporting their adaptation to climate change.

RESCCUE is funded by the French development agency (AFD) and the French global environment facility (FFEM) and implemented through the Pacific Community (SPC).

The project was piloted in four regional countries including Fiji, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and Vanuatu.