Document to summarise key recommendations

World Bank resident representative for the South Pacific Lasse Melgaard (left) at the Pacific Regional Shock Responsive Social Protection Conference in Nadi. Picture: REINAL CHAND

World Bank resident representative for the South Pacific Lasse Melgaard (left) at the Pacific Regional Shock Responsive Social Protection Conference in Nadi. Picture: REINAL CHAND

AN outcome document will be prepared after the conclusion of the Pacific Shock Responsive Social Protection Conference in Nadi last week.

World Bank resident representative for the South Pacific Lasse Melgaard said the document would summarise key recommendations to take forward.

“I see this very much as the beginning journey where the actors who are especially interested, we learn together, we continue this journey of improving basic shock response social protection systems,” he said.

During the three-day workshop, representatives from Pacific Island countries shared experiences about post-disaster recovery efforts.

Mr Melgaard said responses differed and going forward, the plans were different from country to country.

“The really important thing to make sure is to have stronger registries.

This is not Fiji but across the Pacific that you have mechanisms where you identify where the poor populations and basically strengthen the existing systems that you have.

“You have relatively strong social protection systems, so I think first of all, it’s about establishing the systems where they aren’t in existence.”

He said the inaugural conference had also helped shed light on shock responsive social protection.

“The idea behind this is that in the immediate aftermath of disaster, you’d utilise whatever mechanisms you’d have in place to provide support to the people who are most in need.

“This could be poorest households with elderly, or households where people with disabilities live and we have the opportunity to come together with people from all over the Pacific and also from Timor Leste and Papua New Guinea, we have had people from the private sector, civil society organisations all to share experiences about what is going on.”